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6 Life Skills To Teach Your Children

6 Life Skills To Teach Your Children

Becoming a parent can be the single most exciting yet completely overwhelming and intimidating time in your life. Ask any new parent, there is nothing like bringing your first child into the world, and the responsibility is immense

Photo by Daria Obymaha from Pexels

However, for first-time parents, you will inevitably learn as you go, and both you and your child will be able to learn from each and offer a valuable insight into different points of view.

It is never too early for you to start teaching your child different skills. In fact, simply holding them shows them love and reinforces their safety, allowing them to feel calm and content, something both babies and parents can benefit from.

But when it comes to valuable life skills, what should you be imparting to your child as they grow?

Reading

The importance of teaching your child to read should never be overlooked. It is the single most important skill you can teach your child. Reading is vital to your child’s development, from reading them stories as a baby to engaging them with interactive books to help develop their skills. You can find tips for teaching reading comprehension as your child gets older and begins to read independently.

Decision Making Skills

Learning to make smart decisions is an important life skill that everyone should have mastered by the time they are young adults. Determine basic questions, such as which flavor of ice cream you like, do you wear blue or white socks. From the age of six upwards, youngsters can begin learning about the benefits of making good decisions and the detrimental effects of making bad judgments.

Discuss the consequences of decisions with your child and impart the weight of such consequences later in life if they make poor decisions. There are pros and cons to every decision they make, and discussing this with your child so they fully understand can help them become better at making good decisions as an adult.

Hygiene

The younger you start teaching your children about health and hygiene, the better. It’s stressful trying to take care of everything every day, and that’s what we’re teaching our kids every time we give them an assignment. Even when explaining to them, we never tell them why.

Health and hygiene will always be a vital element of their daily routine. Explain to them why this is and what happens if they neglect to take proper care of themselves, especially as they get older.  When they are younger, it might be helpful to make a chart that outlines all the tasks you would like them to do, and they can mark off each one as they finish. When these healthy habits are reinforced and carried out every day without fail, they won’t need a chart before long, and it will become second nature to do them.

Time Management Skills

As everyone knows, getting your family life organized is a daunting task if you don’t have a firm grasp on time management. It is also vital for children to learn lessons about time management now.

Teaching young children about the art of measuring time, tasks, and schedules will make your days easier since, in addition to all of that, it helps them develop an amazing aptitude for time. Because of this, they will be better equipped to handle anything from getting themselves to school on time to someday getting to work on time.

Money Management

From earning pocket money for chores to helping to manage a household budget, teaching your child about money management when they are young will help them to be able to handle their own finances once they start to earn their own money and become financially independent. 

As they get older, these lessons can include the importance of credit, living within your means, balancing a paycheck to save, pay bills and enjoy what they have earned. Many young people are unaware of managing their finances and often make poor decisions simply because they don’t know any better.

Chores

Many times, parents find it simpler to accomplish all the household chores on their own. But teaching our kids how to keep the house clean may have served as an important skill for them when they left for college, as well as when they finally had a house of their own to take care of.

Chore charts that include everything from learning how to make the bed, empty the dishwasher and dust are great chores to begin with. You can make them as age-appropriate as you need and alter this as your child becomes more capable of tackling different chores. 

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